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From OpenJS World 2023: Revolutionizing Browser Automation: A Deep Dive into the WebDriver BiDi Project and its Integration with Selenium – Tamsil Sajid Amani

By Blog, OpenJS World

Talk from Tamsil Sajid Amani, Software Engineer at BrowserStack at OpenJS World 2023 in Bilbao, Spain, September 19-21, 2023.

The web is constantly evolving, and so is how we need to test it. WebDriver BiDi is a new way to control the browser without compromising the ability to use everyday browsers that people use. It is supported by Google, Microsoft, Mozilla, and Apple, making sure all your users are getting the same level of support. It is an ergonomic and powerful tool for browser automation and testing with support for popular testing frameworks like Selenium with more control over low-level events in the browser. Attendees leave with a clear understanding of how WebDriver BiDi can be used to enhance their browser automation and testing capabilities.

Main Sections

00:00 Introduction

02:05 Browser Automation Testing Timeline

03:56 Browser Automation: Two approaches

06:48 WebDriver “Classic”

12:41 Chrome Devtools protocol

17:54 WebDriver BiDi

18:27 Collaboration

21:21 WebDriver BiDi Demo

25:15 Accessibility 

30:30 Questions

OpenJS Resources

About the OpenJS Foundation

Join the OpenJS Foundation

Follow Us on Social

OpenJS World 2021 Keynote Recap: Node.js: The New and the Experimental

By Blog, Node.js

Bethany Griggs, Node.js Technical Steering Committee member, and Senior Software Engineer at Red Hat, describes in detail how new and experimental features are added to the Node.js project.

Griggs starts the talk with an introduction to Node.js, a highly decentralized open-source project, with no forward roadmap and a heavy activity flow in multiple directions. New features are added to the project based on the interests and requirements of the contributors. She introduces the Working Groups and Teams focused on different areas of the project and the Strategic Initiatives which help smooth operations of the project.

Next, Griggs discusses the project delivery schedule for Node.js. There are two major releases per year with even number releases being promoted to Long-Term Support (LTS). She mentions that each release has three defined release phases. During the Current phase, the release line picks up the non-major changes that land on the Node.js main branch. The Active phase incorporates only the new features, fixes, and updates that have been audited and approved by the LTS team. Only critical bug fixes are part of the Maintenance phase and new features are rarely added in this phase.

In the second half, Griggs introduces a Stability Index, ranging from 0 to 3, which allows users to decide on features to use in their applications. She discusses each index in detail with examples for each of these APIs.

Griggs explains that Stability Index 0 indicates a Deprecated API which may be removed in the future versions of Node.js. An API is first Documentation Deprecated and then elevated to a Run-time Deprecation. Stability Index 3 is for Legacy APIs, which are discouraged from being used in new applications. She assures users that Legacy APIs will not be removed by the project, so applications using these APIs will not be affected.

Experimental APIs have a Stability Index of 1 and may change even in the long-term support phase. She warns that users must use them cautiously in production workloads. She further explains that experimental APIs are ones that do not have an agreed-upon design and are later modified based on user feedback. Stability Index 2 is reserved for Stable APIs for which Semantic Versioning applies and compatibility is a priority. Experimental features only get promoted to stable when the main contributors have confidence in the API and no major changes are likely. She then introduces some new stable features of the project.

In her concluding remarks, Griggs encourages users to look at and provide feedback on the experimental features of the project, which helps the project in speeding up the process of promoting experimental features to stable features. She also warns against the use of experimental APIs in critical applications.

Full Video Here

Broken down by section:

Panel Introduction 0:00

Overview 0:48

Introduction to OpenJS Foundation 1:09

Node.js 1:42

What’s next? 3:07

Working Groups and Teams 4:10

Strategic Initiatives 5:06

Releases 7:26

Deprecated APIs 12:14

Legacy APIs 15:12

Experimental APIs 16:47

Stable APIs 25:31

Conclusion 28:26

OpenJS World Keynote: Breaking Transmission Chains with JavaScript

By Blog, OpenJS World

During OpenJS World, which was held virtually June 2-3, we heard from many inspiring people involved in all areas of technology. In this keynote series, we will highlight the key points from the keynote videos. We hope to get a highlight of the speakers in a way that allows for people to hone in on the part of the talk that interests them the most.

Cian Ó Maidín, President and Founder of Nearform, covered how Nearform built a popular exposure notification app. Nearform designs, builds and operates web mobile and cloud platforms at scale. They are firm believers of open source and have been contributors to the Node.js and React ecosystem.

Early last year, Ó Maidín developed a chest infection and flu after returning from a trip. Shortly after, his wife began displaying similar symptoms. He remembered having a discussion with his wife where he predicted that this coronavirus would be soon labelled as a pandemic. A few weeks went by and he received a call from the health services executive in Ireland asking for Ó Maidín’s help to build an exposure notification application. He brought his team together and they built the Covid Tracker.

When building the app, the development team agreed on empowering people, prioritizing privacy, and creating trust and transparency as core principles. Plus make it user-friendly. The app itself helps track the number of people with symptoms and contact tracing. 

In his concluding remarks Ó Maidín mentioned how the success of the app has led to more organizations approaching Nearform, and so they wanted to make it open source and to roll out the technology as quickly as possible. He also stated how this has made them better equipped and ready to face the challenges that may come with the next pandemic.

Full video here

Broken down by section:

Panel introduction 0:14

What is Nearform 0:47

Story of building the exposure notification app 1:46

The call 6:03

Developing Covid Tracker 6:50

Principles 7:11

Journey from March 22nd – July 6th 8:50

What the app looks like 10:11

Scaling 12:58

Covid Green 14:51

Milestones 16:07

Summary 18:05

Closing thoughts and call to action 18:51

OpenJS World Keynote: Open Open Source and Making Great Places for Collaboration

By Blog, OpenJS World

During OpenJS World, which was held virtually in June, we heard from many inspiring people involved in all areas of technology. In this keynote series, we will highlight the key points from the keynote videos. We hope to get a highlight of the speakers in a way that allows for people to hone in on the part of the talk that interests them the most.

During the OpenJS World Keynote Panel, Joe Sepi spoke to leaders in the tech world to hear their insights on the best Open Source practices and steps to make open source a more collaborative environment.

Joe Sepi, an Open Source Engineer and Advocate at IBM, spoke with Michael Dawson, Node.js lead for IBM and Red Hat, and Beth Griggs, Senior Software Engineer at Red Hat. They kicked the discussion off by talking about transparency, accessibility and the open governance model of Node.js. 

In terms of collaboration, Griggs mentioned how accessibility is key to Node.js. In an effort to lower the barriers to entry, being a part of Node.js is as simple as people turning up by clicking on a Zoom link to contribute and join the discussion. She further added that to help make Node.js a more collaborative space, mentorships programs have been set up. For example, she blocks off a couple of hours a week to shadow the process on the release working group. Dawson shared that getting many people together to share ideas requires coming to a consensus; his personal view is that sometimes challenges should be hard as it is better to spend more time in discussion before finalizing a big decision.

In their concluding thoughts, the panelists mentioned ways to get involved: taking a look at the projects hosted by the OpenJS Foundation, looking through the GitHub repos, analyzing your experience and interests and then just joining a call!

Full video here

Broken down by section:

Panel introduction 0:10

Node.js experience 1:03

Accessibility 4:30

The flipside 7:53

The Success of creating the OpenJS Foundation 10:43

Advantages of contributing to open source 13:25

Hiring in open source 15:46

Closing thoughts 18:51

OpenJS World Keynote: Restoring Balance in Technology – Lessons from the Indie Rock DIY Movement

By Blog, OpenJS World

During the OpenJS World Keynote Panel, Robin Ginn spoke to Jenny Toomey to hear her insights on the role the Indie Rock DIY revolution has had on technology and conversely how technology helped transform the music industry. 

Robin Ginn, Executive Director of the OpenJS Foundation, spoke with Jenny Toomey, International Program Director of Technology and Society at the Ford Foundation. Toomey shared her thoughts on the digital music revolution scene in the 90s and explained how Washington DC had many high-performing globally focused individuals; “…it felt like you were at the center of the place where you could change the world.” 

Toomey worked for seven years trying to find a balance between openness and control of records between the artists and record labels. That’s when she realized the way technology was changing the world – she explained that the early challenges of the portfolio included people not realizing ways in which technology was transforming their lives – and the systems that protected them. 

People in positions of power back then thought of technology as transactional as opposed to systemic. 

The Ford Foundation tackles problems of openness by building a field of experts who are concerned about net neutrality. Toomey feels optimistic seeing an enormous shift (which open source people always knew): the way you design something determines if it is rights protecting or rights undermining. She emphasized that competing models are key to transparency and honesty.

In her concluding thoughts Toomey mentioned the importance of bridging the gap between the public and private sector when it comes to matching skills to meet the needs of the public. She also explained how so much of the web is dependent on the invisible toiling of the open source community and how it is necessary for the health of the tech ecosystem. 

Full video here

Broken down by section:

Panel introduction 0:50

Washington DC music scene 0:54

Technology changing the music scene 6:07

Early Challenges 9:45

Strategies and solutions 12:23

Voice of the musician being lost in policy 16:37

Advice for those interested in working for the government & public interest tech 24:17

Concluding thoughts and favorite musician 32:19

How Open Governance Influences Open Source & Inner Source at GoDaddy

By Blog, OpenJS World

During the OpenJS World, held virtually in June, we heard from many inspiring people involved in all areas of technology. In this keynote series, we will highlight the key points from the keynote videos. We hope to share highlights of the speakers in a way that allows for people to discover what parts of the talk interest them the most.

In a recent Keynote Speech, Charlie Robbins and Jonathan Keslin talked about how Open Governance at GoDaddy’s organizational structure mirrors their communication structure, known as Conway’s law. GoDaddy supports internal groups in an effort to push the decision process to the engineers and content experts. They only use those outside their field when necessary. 

This technique has been successful for GoDaddy (GD). This process went on for a few years before a pattern emerged. Once they were motivated, volunteers stayed engaged because of interest in the mission of their group.

As GoDaddy’s internal and external communities have grown, so did the need for structure and governance. They created GoDaddy {open}. This is GD’s name for its open governance structure, a nexus of technology and community. It is extensible and repeatable and fostered by leadership. GD {open} groups are bodies meant to drive business outcomes or policies. They are formed across disciplines both technical and non-technical. It gives visibility to other parts of the company through shared goals.

Guilds are another form of open governance used at GoDaddy. Guilds are groups of people formed around a specific topic, such as a programming language. Individuals rally around a technical topic, sharing best practices and forming a community. One thing that guilds are not is a group that talks about standards or infrastructure. They are communities that come together to learn and grow. GoDaddy also participates in trade groups such as OpenJS, Domain Name Association, and Node.js. GD open lets them coordinate these across the company. GoDaddy also is an open-sourced supporter, and have many different projects released to open source and communicate these efforts with their engineering blog. GoDaddy doesn’t have all the answers, but they do support them whenever they can. 

Full link here

Broken down by section:

Conway’s Law 0:44

Open Governance for internal groups 1:10

Application of Open GoDaddy 2:35

GoDaddy Open Governance 3:40

Organizational Structure 4:00

Model of GoDaddy open 4:16

Application of Open Governance Groups 4:54

Guilds 5:40

What is a guild? 6:54

GoDaddy Participation 7:24

Open-source Supporter 7:36

GoDaddy External Support in Open Governance 8:16

Special Offer: Get 50% Node.js certification and training when you register for OpenJS World

By Blog, OpenJS World

With OpenJS World right around the corner, we want to offer you a special event discount on the OpenJS Node.js Training courses and Certification exams. The OpenJS Foundation and Linux Foundation Training are pleased to offer discounts for each OpenJS World registrant. 

Each one-time use coupon is only available for registrants of the event and will expire as of 11:59 pm PT on June 5, 2021. The discount cannot be combined with any other discount or promotion and is only valid for new training purchases and cannot be applied to a previously purchased exam or bundle. 

Details on how to access and download the coupon will be provided to registered attendees via email on June 2, 2021.

You’ll be able to  take 50% off any one of the following:

Certification
OpenJS Node.js Services Developer (JSNSD)
OpenJS Node.js Application Developer (JSNAD)

eLearning
Node.js Application Development (LFW211)
Node.js Services Development (LFW212)

Bundle and Save
Node.js Application Development (LFW211) + JSNAD Exam Bundle
Node.js Services Development (LFW212) + JSNSD Exam Bundle

More information on the OpenJS Certification program is available here: https://openjsf.org/certification/ 
To register for OpenJS World go here: https://www.cvent.com/d/17qhqx/4W?ct=50221cf5-5496-4c34-9ec0-3b52b1bf1204

OpenJS World 2021: Development Track

By Blog, OpenJS World

Excitement is building for our annual conference, OpenJS World! On June 2, developers, software architects, engineers, and other community members from OpenJS Foundation as well as folks from hosted projects such as AMP, Fastify, Electron, and Node.js will tune in to network, learn and collaborate. 

As we approach June 2, we want to shine a light onto the amazing content submitted by the community and curated by the OpenJS World program committee. Here’s the full schedule. Our event will feature tracked playlists that will go live once keynotes conclude and we’ll be scheduling time with our speakers so audience members can ask questions. If you haven’t already, join our community Slack channel.

The Development Track was a quite a popular tracks for our submissions this year and will feature some informative talks for beginners and seasoned developers alike.

Some highlighted talks in the Development Track include:

Here’s the full track: 

Thanks to our wonderful Foundation members and sponsors for all they do to support open innovation through the OpenJS Foundation.

Thank you to the OpenJS World program committee for their tireless efforts in bringing in and selecting top-tier keynote speakers and interesting and informative sessions. We are honored to work with such a dedicated and supportive community!

OpenJS World 2021: Save the Date!

By Announcement, Blog, Event, OpenJS World

The OpenJS Foundation’s annual conference is happening June 2, speaker submissions now open!

*this post was updated to reflect the updated event date which changed from June 9 to June 2nd, Details here: https://openjsf.org/blog/2021/03/05/openjs-world-2021-change-and-2022-dates/

Mark your calendars! OpenJS World 2021, a virtual open source conference from the OpenJS Foundation, goes live on June 2. Join JavaScript professionals including developers, software engineers, developer advocates and business leaders from OpenJS Foundation hosted projects such as AMP, Dojo, Electron, and Node.js to network, learn and collaborate with community members. 

Today, we are excited to announce several keynote speakers, open the Call for Papers, and share the event sponsorship prospectus.

OpenJS World 2021 will take place as a free, virtual experience, and with keynotes premiering from the OpenJS Foundation YouTube Channel and sessions to be published immediately after.  This format will allow for an on demand, “Netflix style” experience with a specific premier time and flexibility for international audience viewing, as well as more discussion opportunities with speakers. The event will also feature additional engagement opportunities, such as Slack chats and live workshops, mixed throughout.  

Initial Keynote speakers

Anna Lytical, Digital Coding Educator, Drag Queen, and Google engineer
Cian Ó Maidín, CEO of NearForm
Lin Clark, Senior Principal Software Engineer at Fastly
Scott Hanselman, Partner Program Manager at Microsoft

Call For Papers

CFPs are open! If you have a session that you’d like to submit, please do so by February 15, 2021. Submit your talk here. The conference will cover a range of topics for developers and end-users alike including frameworks, security, serverless, diagnostics, education, IoT, AI, front-end engineering, and much more. 

Event Sponsorship

This year, the OpenJS Foundation is offering event sponsorship as an exclusive OpenJS Foundation membership benefit. If you are interested in becoming a member of the OpenJS Foundation, this is a great time to join! Learn more about membership here and check out the event prospectus for details and benefits. 

Thank you to our current members and event sponsors for supporting the OpenJS Foundation and OpenJS World!

Interested in participating online in OpenJS World? Register now

Thank you to the OpenJS World program committee for their tireless efforts. We are honored to work with such a dedicated and supportive community!

Production Loading Performance 10 Years Later

By Blog, OpenJS World

Nicole Sullivan, Product Manager for Chrome at Google, recently hosted an informative keynote presentation with Google software engineer Shubhie Panicker on production loading performance during OpenJS World. Their collaboration in this area spans over 10 years, and the presentation begins with a look back at loading performance issues and then opens into how steps are being taken to improve performance currently. 

The discussion ranges from problems with loading to how OpenJS is helping partners to develop and test programming. This video can help individuals interested in systemic web performance issues and current projects to solve them. It may also be of interest to individuals who own domains with retention issues based on loading times. 

You can watch the full interview here: 

Full Video Here

Introductions (0:00)

Loading Performance Then and Now (1:00)

Developer’s Tooling (3:30)

What’s the Problem with Loading? (4:15)

First Interaction Delay (6:00)

You COULD Solve These Problems By Yourself… (8:12)

What are SDKs? (9:50)

Next.js and React  (11:05)

Initial Perf Wins (12:19)

Tested Concurrent Mode (14:00)

What’s Next? (16:18)

Much thanks to Nicole and Shubhie!

During the OpenJS Foundation global conference, OpenJS World, we heard from many inspiring leaders. In this keynote series, we will highlight the key points from the keynote videos.